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Did you know?

  • One in four women struggled to purchase period products within the past year due to a lack of income

  • One in five low-income women report missing work, school or similar events due to a lack of access to period supplies

  • Lack of access to period supplies is linked to using substitute products (toilet tissue, socks, etc.), stretching product usage, and missing important events

  • An overwhelming 88% of women agree that period products are a basic necessity

  • Only 4% of women are aware of a local resource where free or reduced cost period supplies are available

  • State and Federal safety net programs, such as SNAP (aka food stamps) and WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) cannot be used to purchase period supplies.

Source: 2018 U by Kotex survey conducted by YouGov.

Seventy-four percent of families with children that are headed by a single mother in NEFL live below the ALICE threshold for poverty. - United Way, ALICE report, 2017.

Around the globe, on any given day, more than 800 million people are menstruating. And at least 500 million of those lack adequate resources – including supplies, education and facilities – for managing their periods. - 25 Years: Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water, 2015 Update and MDG Assessment (New York: UNICEF and World Health Organization, 2015)

“Entrenched stigma marginalizes menstruation and exacerbates the conditions of poverty, not only undermining the health of women and girls, but also curtailing their opportunities. The result is, effectively, a denial of their equal chance to obtain an education, to acquire the tools to escape poverty and contribute to the economy, and to participate fully and productively in civic life. When half of the population is held back, all of society suffers as a result”. – Periods Gone Public, Jennifer Weiss-Wolf.

The most recent Always Confidence & Puberty Survey reveals that nearly one in five American girls have either left school early or missed school entirely because they did not have access to period products. At puberty, a girl’s confidence plummets, with the onset of menstruation marking the lowest moment for many girls. But the drop in confidence is so much worse for girls that lack access to period protection. It can force her to miss out on important confidence-building activities in the classroom, on the field, in extra-curricular school programs, and limit her potential far beyond puberty. While lack of access to period products is typically associated with girls in other countries, period poverty isn’t just someone else’s problem. It’s happening right here in North America. - Always Confidence and Puberty Study, Nov. 2017; based on U.S. females 16-24 years old; 2016 U.S. census


ADDITIONAL RESEARCH

Six young women from Bronx Prep Middle School discuss the taboo around periods, and how this stigma affects them and the community beyond.

How access to period products removes a barrier to education  - PBS News Hour 2019

How access to period products removes a barrier to education - PBS News Hour 2019

For Homeless Women, Getting Their Period Is One Of The Most Difficult Challenges  - Huffington Post

For Homeless Women, Getting Their Period Is One Of The Most Difficult Challenges - Huffington Post

United Way, ALICE Report  - 2017 Update for Florida

United Way, ALICE Report - 2017 Update for Florida

Homeless Periods: A Problem of Poverty, Dignity, and Feminine Hygiene  - Soapboxie

Homeless Periods: A Problem of Poverty, Dignity, and Feminine Hygiene - Soapboxie

No girl should have to miss school because of her period  - Huffington Post

No girl should have to miss school because of her period - Huffington Post

The Fight to End Period Shaming Is Going Mainstream  - Newsweek

The Fight to End Period Shaming Is Going Mainstream - Newsweek

Florida prisons struggle to provide feminine products  - Tampa Bay Times

Florida prisons struggle to provide feminine products - Tampa Bay Times